Showing posts with label Epexegesis. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Epexegesis. Show all posts

Sunday, January 19, 2020

Wakeypedia






Everyone postures as if they're woke
Worldwide data and inter-connectivity and trust 
Dancing around their globe together
Omnipresent, omniscient, omnibenevolent
Experts in every field
Standards for every market
Faith in what has been established 
All are effected by its gnosis
All can attain its level of epic social triunity
All is seen and worshipped
Yet even after the mountain is climbed 
Some still doubt

Our good news is that most people believe what is reported
They don't believe all that is reported, and they needn't
We just expect them to believe some report
About what not to believe 
And why not to believe
They can't help but trust what's available
Even those who trust independent research
Are influenced by the boundaries we fixed
By the experts we diffused
Resting upon faith in something we established
Every believer nods their pig head
And shares their sausage links

The big yellow banner
Sometimes red
Sometimes gray
Flies like a flag across the screen 
They use it to prove their logic
If everyone gave two dollars today 
Our priests of culture would be fully funded
Who cares if the machine gets a few facts wrong 
What matters is getting their dopamine to accelerate proportionally
With feeling justified in someone's sight
This centralized resource is really good, they say
Trust us, it has everything you need to know

Don't listen to those who tell you otherwise
They sermonize and sell propaganda
Ours, on the other hand, is loaded with blue hyperverbiage 
Sending the imagination off to idyllic Jepsteinian islands
Idoltyouzo and Eurofuchinittyacht are two popular staycation spots
Where political pedophilia is hidden in plain sight
And public eyes are wide shut
Our analytics reveal that when you click and go deep
Down that rabbit hole of faith in our services
You discover that there is no way
To prove everything wrong 
And we provide every means of transportation along the way

Trust the established authorities
Or follow the crumbs feeding quackery
Our science about Anatidae is settled
Whether they acknowledge it or not 
Like the last judgment
They will bow down now 
Or they will bow later
In the end they all bow
Let him save himself
We know that resistance is futile
Why would any man trust his own might 
When they can participate in our aeonic masquerade of conviviality 


















Sunday, January 12, 2020

The cause of their condemnation: That firmly rooted Tree of life








As I noted in a previous series of posts, most scholars nowadays presume that the clear eschatological promises and expectations woven throughout the New Testament "Scriptures" have not yet been fulfilled, even though they also clearly read as though they were meant to be interpreted as to-be-fulfilled in that first century generation. In this post I want to continue that sporadic series I started late last year. 

For those who follow this blog, it should already be abundantly clear that I have thought about this academically hot topic in lengthy detail for over a decade (see here and here and here and here and here and here), so this isn't some kind of stream-of-consciousness eisegesis or exegesis on my part. I have researched this topic extensively, and I have reached a point in life when I am willing to share how I feel about it all. I am seriously bothered by both the hubris of many contemporary biblical scholars and the apathetic torpor of brilliant academicians who specialize in the field of Second-Temple Judaism and early Christianity. Even though most of them admit that the New Testament corpus of literature clearly refers to first century cataclysmic events about "the end of the world" in direct relation to first century historical events surrounding the Roman/Jewish wars, the destruction of Jerusalem, and the fall of Herod's Temple in AD 70 (the axis mundi of first century Rabbinic Judaism), they all nevertheless invent farcically esoteric theories and inane paradigms for interpreting first century Judean eschatological language to justify their presumption that such "prophecy" and historical allusions to first century events were not really divinely revelatory prior to the events they describe, and also did not actually become fulfilled in the first century. All "prophecy" supposedly must be recorded to look like they're referring to past events. But it wasn't all true prophecy anyway, because we know that the end of the world has not literally occurred yet, according to Gospel prophecy. At best, the parousia of Christ has been delayed thousands of years, and no one knows the day nor the hour. 

I have hundreds of pages of notes among scholarly publications that I own, highlighting such professional opinions. After all these years of trying to become convinced along with them, I now think that such presumptions are based entirely upon official yet questionable dogmas that developed organically through various politically and ecclesiologically philosophical concerns which arose centuries after the Second-Temple early Christian period. Only those scholars who are not beholden to questionable tribalistic dogmas are brave enough to challenge the status quo, reading the texts with literary, historical, and rhetorical integrity.

Although today's post is only topically related to the subject of New Testament eschatological fulfillment in the first century, I consider this post to be a unique and important shift in perspective. I have never commented publicly at length about Christian "scriptures" that are clearly pseudepigraphic and vaticinium ex eventu. In the past I have insisted that the New Testament Scriptures are historically reliable and rhetorically coherent, or else they are false and unreliable witnesses to first century expectations and events. In this post, I'm not going to stop insisting as much. Instead, I will be upping the ante to such positions. Despite the many and disjointed scholarly conjectures about New Testament eschatological promises being unfulfilled and delayed, even delayed beyond our own future (in the present time), I will be insisting in future posts that a huge amount of writings outside of the New Testament literary corpus actually bear witness to the New Testament eschatological expectations, and thereby testify literarily to first century historical events being their actual fulfillment. I will be upping the ante today by using pseudepigraphic, ex eventu "scriptures" to illustrate that first century fulfillment was the primary reason for composing such "scriptures."

In this post, I want to show how one, small, and highly relevant piece of pseudepigraphic Jewish-Christian literature that has clearly been written after the events of AD 70 (and thereby vaticinium ex eventu by design), can be an extremely valuable and helpful specimen for understanding and appreciating the New Testament eschatological message of first century fulfillment. The specimen of which I am speaking is known as 4 Baruch (the Paraleipomena Jeremiou, also known in the Ethiopic tradition as "The rest of the words of Baruch," the scribe of Israel's prophet, Jeremiah).

Below is an excerpt taken from Dale C. Allison's translation of 4 Baruch 9:7-21.
...After saying these things, and while standing in the area of the altar with Baruch and Abimelech, he became like one of those handing over his soul. And Baruch and Abimelech remained weeping and crying with a great voice, "Woe to us because our father Jeremiah, the priest of God, has left us and gone away." All the people heard their weeping, and they all ran to them, and they saw Jeremiah lying on the ground as though dead. And they tore their garments and put dust on their heads and wept most bitterly. And after these things, they prepared themselves to bury him. And behold! a voice came, saying "Do not bury one who yet lives, because his soul is returning to his body again." And when they heard the voice, they did not bury him, but for three days they remained in a circle around his body, talking (with each other) and being perplexed as to what time he was going to stand up. After three days, his soul re-entered his body, and he raised his voice in the midst of all and said, 
"Glorify God with one voice, all (of you) glorify God and the Son of God who awakens us, Jesus Christ the light of all the ages, the unquenchable light, the life of faith. And it will happen after these times that there will be another 477 years, and he will come to earth.1 And the tree of life, which is planted in the middle of paradise, will make all the unfruitful trees bear fruit, and grow, and send forth shoots. And it will make the trees that had (sprouted) and grown great and said, 'We have sent our top to the sky,' together with their high branches, to shrivel up; and that firmly rooted tree will cause them to be condemned. And it will make that which is scarlet to become white as wool. The snow will be turned black, the sweet waters will become salty, and the salty will become sweet in the great light of the joy of God. And he will bless the islands so that they produce fruit by the word from the mouth of his Christ. For he will come, and he will go out, and he will choose for himself twelve apostles, so that they might preach the good news among the nations. He whom I have seen has been adorned by his Father, and he is coming into the world upon the Mount of Olives; and he will fill the hungry souls." 
While Jeremiah was saying these things concerning the Son of God, that he is coming into the world, the people became furious and said, "These are once again the words spoken by Isaiah the son of Amos when he said, 'I saw God and the Son of God.' Come then, and let us not kill him by the death (with which we killed) that one, but let us stone him with stones."....2




In this story, the prophet Jeremiah is miraculously revived for the purpose of sharing an eschatological vision of Jesus Christ coming hundreds of years later, to the land of Israel. At that special eschatological time, "the tree of life" which is planted in the protological Garden of Eden --the "middle of paradise"-- will bring about miraculous change among the nations surrounding Israel: unfruitful trees will bear fruit and send out shoots for future Garden expansion. The apostate leadership of Israel, described throughout the literature of Second-Temple Judaism and early Christianity, are the trees who would be judged by God severely, for they would sprout and grow greatly, boasting like one who ascends to heaven, up to the plane of ruling stars. The surrounding trees of Israel would become shriveled up and condemned by "that firmly rooted tree" of life in the midst of Paradise. 

At that time, that Tree in paradise will also reverse the fortunes of the surrounding trees of Israel's land in order to expand the Garden's fruitfulness. A tiny portion of this fortune-reversal pericope is structured chiastically, for poetic emphasis: 

A) that which is scarlet will become white as wool  (i.e. the "unclean" will become "clean")
  B) the snow will be turned black  (i.e. the "clean" will become "unclean")
  B') the sweet waters will become salty  (i.e. the "fresh" will become "repugnant")
A') the salty will become sweet  (i.e. the "repugnant" will become "fresh")


Finally and wondrously, all of this would take place "in the great light of the joy of God." That Son of God, "Jesus Christ," whom Jeremiah had seen while lying on the ground in virtual death for three days, would come into the world upon the Mount of Olives, and fill the hungry souls. As Dale C. Allison, Jr. has highlighted:
A reader of the NT may think of stories in which Jesus is on the Mount of Olives... One might also recall the many texts in which the risen Jesus discourses on the Mount of Olives. It is more likely, however, that the second coming is in view. 4 Baruch takes up the language of Zech 14:4-5, an eschatological text which Jewish readers often connected with the resurrection of the dead and which some early Christian texts associated with the parousia. If so, 4 Baruch likely assumes, in line with a host of other ancient sources, that Jerusalem, the axis mundi, will be the center of the end-time events.3


Notice carefully that Allison presumes that Jesus' discourses on the Mount of Olives can be separated conceptually from the "second coming," the "parousia," and "the resurrection of the dead." According to Allison, the author of 4 Baruch imagines along with "a host of other ancient sources" that Jerusalem was the center of the end-time events, but Allison's own personal eschatological convictions about the parousia and the resurrection of the dead preclude the possibility of the "end times" actually being fulfilled in the destruction of first century Jerusalem. But why must we assume this, too? 

Here's an honest question of mine: Why not consider all of those events taking place in that first century generation, as Jesus said it would


Allison associates all of those things with a "second coming," a phrase that isn't even mentioned in the New Testament! The closest remark to a "second" coming of the Lord Jesus is found in Hebrews 9:28, which, in its very close context alongside verses 24-27 (compare with Heb. 9:8-9), clearly refers to Christ's appearance at the end of the ages, in that generation. The author of Hebrews is the one who defines the terms for us, and sets the time-frame in which the end of the ages takes place. He says that Christ "appeared" once "at the end of the ages" to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. It is in that immediate context that he also mentions that Jesus would "appear a second time" (which, if you were a recipient of this authentic letter among a first century audience, such an "appearance" would obviously be in that generation because the first "appearance" was at the end of the ages, not the beginning of the ages). That second appearance would not be to put away sin (which, in context, means to suffer repeatedly, to sacrifice himself again, etc.), but instead to save all those who eagerly waited for him. Such an eager expectation happens to comport very well with preterist hermeneutic, because most (!!) eschatological expectations of Second-Temple Judaism hoped for ancestors to be raised from the dead-ones in Hades/Sheol at the coming of Israel's Messiah. 

Let's now rewind a bit, and get our focus back onto 4 Baruch

Let's not forget that 4 Baruch is clearly vaticinium ex eventu and pseudepigraphic. Baruch, the servant of Jeremiah, did not prophesy about Jesus Christ by name, or his disciples by number. We should now be asking why anyone after the fulfillment of such extraordinary first century events would write as though they actually were old testament prophets of Israel, foreseeing motifs of eschatological renewal and resurrection hundreds of years in advance.

Let's now ask an obvious question: Why would an author (or redactor) of "scriptural" history such as 4 Baruch compose such a story?

Isn't it obvious that 4 Baruch was designed to persuade readers after the events of AD 70 that they had already been clearly fulfilled in that generation of Jesus and his apostles, within the first century

For most Christians this is a large pill to swallow because it appears heterodox. I'm not bothered by such suspicions. I think there are numerous ways in which to fit such paradigms into orthodoxy; but sorting that out is not a concern of mine at the moment. For now, I'm just thinking out loud about what I have studied and how I think it can be interpreted; and I think there are only two ways to interpret 4 Baruch 9:7-21. Either the New Testament promises and expectations of imminent eschatological fulfillment were historically reliable and rhetorically coherent, or else they were false and unreliable witnesses to first century expectations and events. 4 Baruch was composed long after such first century fulfillment, to tell a story about the destruction of Jerusalem in Jeremiah's day. That story concludes with Jeremiah being martyred like Jesus Christ for telling Israel about a vision he had while lying as a dead man for three days. That vision was about the trees of Israel (i.e. the leaders) being condemned by God's chief and chosen tree, the Tree of life. That vision promised the definitive beginning of God's proctological Garden-expansion project finally getting underway; but that necessitated purging all the rotten trees around the Tree of life, in order to spread seeds of life upon the surrounding nations. At that time, the unclean would become clean, and the fresh waters of Israel would become repugnant. Jesus Christ, the Son of God, would come into the world upon the Mount of Olives and fill hungry souls. All of that, notably, referred to the appearing of Christ a second time in that generation, at the end of the ages, to save all those who eagerly waited for him. It alluded to the "end time events" of Zechariah 14, an eschatological text which ancient Jewish literature and iconography connected with the resurrection of the dead-ones from Sheol/Hades who had been awaiting eternal life with their promised Messiah's exaltation to the right hand of his Heavenly Father.

With all of this in mind, I still contend that if Christians continue to presume that the clear eschatological promises and expectations woven throughout the New Testament Scriptures have not yet been fulfilled, even though they also clearly read as though they were meant to be interpreted that way, the integrity of New Testament scriptures as historically reliable and rhetorically credible witnesses to Jesus Christ will never be taken seriously by the surrounding world.

4 Baruch is not an exception to that rule either. 4 Baruch 9:7-21 was meant to be interpreted as to-be-fulfilled in that first century generation in which Jesus, Israel's Messiah, had lived and died, was raised from the dead-ones, and was vindicated in the promised destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70, like YHWH's word was vindicated in his prophet Jeremiah's life and message about the destruction of Jerusalem and Israel's first temple (Jer. 52:12-16; cf. 2 Kings 25:8-12; 2 Chron. 36:17-21; Psa. 137). 














1.  The Greek manuscripts actually read ες τν γν, "into the land." The translation of γν as "earth" is often misleading because it is easily interpreted anachronistically. Ancient eastern cultures thought in terms of territories, tribes, and land.
2. Dale C. Allison, Jr., 4 Baruch [Commentaries on Early Jewish Literature], (Berlin/Boston: Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2019), pp. 393-4
3. Ibid. p. 443






Tick-tocking




Fear of living long
No time to think about then
Do the best I can

Fear of dying quick
Reward myself with leisure
Take another drag

Fear of living quick
You're petty and controlling
And high maintenance

Fear of dying long
No time to think about that
Do the best you can














Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Proverbial Children






What kind of world are we leaving for our children?
Questions from Hades bubble up from its pit
the living dead overflow with words
Patience and fortitude are not virtues
silence and stillness are
kindness would not be
when empathy could be given
being intelligent is also not
thoughtfulness is
Humility is 
not thinking less of yourself
or thinking of yourself less
Thinking rightly of yourself
humility is 
Being clever is also not
diligence is
boldness would not be
when turning the other cheek could 
erudition and cajolery are not virtues
actual, clear, and concise communication is
The resurrected soul decants works of art
querying apples of gold in necklaces of Sardian stone
What kind of children are we leaving for our world?














Tuesday, December 24, 2019

Because




only a few are watching
no one talks about it
we were trained to take in what was dished out
it gets ignored or whined about and denied
there's a breakdown in communication
nothing was ever read before
this notepad finally got your attention
others were willing to listen
they didn't flip out
their world didn't come to an end
their temple wasn't threatened
their priesthood didn't change
they rarely chose to punt
muteness tastes stale and boring
obsequious politeness looks runny and insipid
eternal niceties feel worse than purgatory
everyone knows it's in the room
it's gotta leave the room somehow
no one wants to do anything about it
i'm the only one suggesting it gets eaten
i'll even use the tusks for broth













Monday, December 23, 2019

Eulogy for David P. Jesse





Standing in front of his crowd
He had a voice that was strong and loud
He took a stand on every little thing
Ranting and pointing his finger
At every unteachable heart
Because he had a lot to say
And he sure could yell
We’ll miss him

He had a lot to say
about “the goal” of God’s Law
about Historicism and patriotism
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about patterns of Satan
Globalism, Islam, and the Papacy
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about debate strategies of Jesus Christ
about protestant ethics and the spirit of capitalism
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about the demonic intent of tattoos
marriage plagues, Proverbs 31 women, and sex that’s no fun 
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about Fidel Castro at weddings and Hammurabi's economics
about spontaneous human combustion and Arigo the Brazilian healer
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about the Imperial Kerux
Attacking the foundational pentateuch, the Albigensian crusade, and Athanasius
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about unidentified flying objects and Lucifer …“The Morning Star”
about astrology, seances, and contact with the dead
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about Satan’s strategic strikes
about the REAL evil of socialism, the Titanic, and Scipio Africanus
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about leaving Christian “Fortress America” undefended
Satanic counterfeits of Christ’s word, false prophesies of His return, and “Judgement”
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about it being better to be Herod’s ‘Hus’ than Herod’s ‘Huios’
about the “two or three witnesses rule” and the “God changers”
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about kings and battles and battles and kings
Isaiah’s amazing prophecy IS the Weber Thesis
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about Reformations and removing the hedge around us
about the “Culture Carriers” and the destructive generation of the 60’s
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He had a lot to say
about a thesis proving the REAL, historical existence of …SATAN
(you know the one …the REAL devil)
He had a lot to say
We'll miss him

He sure could yell
Ranting and pointing his finger
At everything but his unteachable heart
Some day we'll be in heaven together
Laughing about how wrong he was
Because he had a lot to say
He had a lot of nothing to say
We're gonna miss him









Friday, December 20, 2019

Poisoning the well




You don't even know me
You've never met me
Before you chatted live about me
we never crossed paths anywhere
Not online
Not over the phone
Not in person
Nowhere
Not once
I think that's important to realize
If you can't make your mind up
we will never get started
And I don't want to wind up
being parted, broken hearted
We have chatted a little since then
in the comments of your stream
And you didn't even realize
I was the blogger
You devoted over an hour
To demonize
To discredit
To slander
To exploit
You told me
that he denies
things you took
verbatim from his site
And perhaps I have even erased them by now
Don't fret
I haven't and I won't 
erase a single word
I can't even imagine 
why you would presume so
and say so to a complete stranger
That seemed like a tactic 
a spiteful child
or curmudgeonly old, self-aggrandizing bitch 
would use to poison the well
Perhaps I was the one with mistaken opinions
Perhaps you're a real geode
You won't admit you really love me
And so, how am I ever to know
You only tell me perhaps
I even suggested studying the book
about dating John's Apocalypse
which demonstrates convincingly
by overwhelming evidence
that it was not written in 95 a.d.
but rather most definitely before A.D. 70
You then said you were not sure
of that particular book
But you've read some in the past
Whatever that means
A million times I ask you
And then I ask you over again
You only answer perhaps
Perhaps you're just a joke with a concordance
And the spells you cast from your magic book
make people laugh and laugh and laugh
Perhaps
Perhaps
Perhaps









Thursday, December 19, 2019

Catena of Dangerous Denial



I think futurists are close-minded fear-mongers.
I am the one who is not open to whatever Scripture teaches.
I do not treat fellow believers with dignity.
I am trying to sound academic or intellectual.
I am the one using word-salad.
This is all a hand-wave dismissal of valid research methods and appeal to evidence.
Daniel was written at least one thousand years before Christ.
I ignore the Bible's own precedent for prophesies prior to the time of Christ.
I think that God shouldn't have given that prophesy until the generation to whom it referred was born.
I think God only gives prophesies to people whom they apply to.
I depend upon the allegorical approach to Scripture.
I am the one using a bullying tactic.

Where did I describe futurism as a "conjured-up social paradigm"?
Can you admit that you can be wrong?
It looks like you did not actually read point number four.
What about footnote number seventy four?
You never mentioned it once, yet that was the background of point number four.
One hour, eighteen minutes, forty one seconds, press play.
The door of being convinced swings both ways, you say.

I have concluded that God only and always writes about current or imminent events.
I mock the idea that any prophesy would be given to people it doesn't apply to.
I paint us all with that brush.
I write pejoratively and abusively.
I know it was a cheap shot.
Humility and teachability are your virtues.
Self-contradiction is all over the place.
I am disingenuous.
I appeal to popularity.
I deny that "this generation" can have any other possible meaning than that of time.
I don't believe in a very real and physical kingdom.
I take away our blessed hope.









Bible Literalist?



Truly, I say to you, you will not have gone through all the towns of Israel before the Son of Man comes. 

The men of Nineveh will rise up at the judgment with this generation.  

The queen of the South will rise up at the judgment with this generation. 

To what shall I compare this generation?

Have you understood all these things? 

O faithless and twisted generation, how long am I to be with you? 

Truly, I say to you, all these things will come upon this generation. 

Truly, I say to you, this generation will not pass away until all these things take place.

Truly, I say to you, there are some standing here who will not taste death until they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.